Longer Content on a Variety of Topics:

Organizing Your WordPress Data: Understanding Custom Taxonomies vs Custom Fields

April 15th, 2014 | Posted at WPShout 

WordPress, as any good content management system should, offers a couple really useful ways to store data about your content. You can attach to your content-types — which for better worse still go by the name “posts” in much of WordPress — two importantly distinct kinds of data. A question that comes up after youContinue Reading

This is a post from WPShout. If you enjoyed the post, please head over to the site and share or leave a comment! –> Organizing Your WordPress Data: Understanding Custom Taxonomies vs Custom Fields

The Value of Curiousity

April 14th, 2014 | Posted at Frozen Toothpaste 

There’s a saying I don’t much like; maybe you’ve heard it. It says “curiosity killed the cat.” The reason I don’t like it is pretty simple: it’s wrong. It drags the good name of curiosity through the mud for the sake of some supposed safety. It’s possible that curiosity contributed to the cat’s death, but […]

The post The Value of Curiousity appeared first on Frozen Toothpaste.

Adam Brown’s Hooks List

April 11th, 2014 | Posted at WPShout 

There’s not really a shortage of ways to find WordPress hooks, filters, functions, and more. It was actually Jeff Chandler’s story about Hookr.io — a new entrant into the field — that reminded me of this one which I remember from years ago. It’s not especially pretty, but it’s a deep resource that makes itContinue Reading

This is a post from WPShout. If you enjoyed the post, please head over to the site and share or leave a comment! –> Adam Brown’s Hooks List

Why You Should Write Down Your Passwords and Never Reuse Them

April 9th, 2014 | Posted at Press Up 

There are a few commonly-known password sins, in rough order of how I think most people think of them: Writing down your password. Telling someone else your password. Reusing a password. Of these, many people — myself included — were historically led to think that the first is the worst. Back in the old days, [...]

The post Why You Should Write Down Your Passwords and Never Reuse Them appeared first on Press Up.

Why You Should Write Down Your Passwords and Never Reuse Them

April 9th, 2014 | Posted at Press Up 

There are a few commonly-known password sins, in rough order of how I think most people think of them: Writing down your password. Telling someone else your password. Reusing a password. Of these, many people — myself included — were historically led to think that the first is the worst. Back in the old days, [...]

The post Why You Should Write Down Your Passwords and Never Reuse Them appeared first on Press Up.

The Power of Understanding the Different Levels of Knowing

April 7th, 2014 | Posted at Frozen Toothpaste 

We humans are complicated and intelligent creatures. We know a lot of stuff. A lot a lot. We can name hundreds of different plants and animals. We can cook. We can speak a language. We can read that same language from symbols put on paper. We can make paper. We can understand what it means […]

The post The Power of Understanding the Different Levels of Knowing appeared first on Frozen Toothpaste.

DevPress sold for $14,000 on Flippa

April 6th, 2014 | Posted at WPShout 

Brian Krogsgard breaking a WordPress news story this weekend: DevPress — a WordPress theme club that began as a collaboration between Tung Do, Justin Tadlock, Patrick Daly, and Ptah Dunbar — each a significant presence in the WordPress space on their own — was sold by its long term owner Tung Do on the website-sellingContinue Reading

This is a post from WPShout. If you enjoyed the post, please head over to the site and share or leave a comment! –> DevPress sold for $14,000 on Flippa

Everything You Should Know about WordPress Custom Fields

April 1st, 2014 | Posted at WPShout 

WordPress is a great platform for managing content. If you have any content that comes in article-like units, it’s hard for me to come up with a good reason that WordPress shouldn’t be used. Sure, collaboration’s easier with a wiki, and Drupal’s a bit easier to sell into the “enterprise,” but WordPress pulls its weightContinue Reading

This is a post from WPShout. If you enjoyed the post, please head over to the site and share or leave a comment! –> Everything You Should Know about WordPress Custom Fields

Redis Object Cache

March 31st, 2014 | Posted at WPShout 

I was just wondering the other day if anyone had ever used Redis instead of Memcached for high-performance in-memory caching with WordPress. Then I saw on Post Status that Eric Hitter and Eric Mann (his explanatory post) released a plugin with exactly …

On Dreaming Your Dreams

March 31st, 2014 | Posted at Frozen Toothpaste 

One of the hardest things I’ve learned in my life is that dreaming doesn’t make it so. This sounds so self-evidently true that you’d think I never needed to learn it. But I knew it, and sometimes still know it, only intellectually. What’s needed to really grow and mature and become the person you want […]

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Let’s Try Abstracting Data Storage in WordPress

March 26th, 2014 | Posted at WPShout 

This post’s a bit of an “advanced WordPress development” exclusive, but I can’t help but nod along with most of Eric Mann’s points in this post proposing a change to the way WordPress stores data. Because it’s so deeply integrated into WordPress, it’s impossible to exaggerate how long it would take — even if aContinue Reading

This is a post from WPShout. If you enjoyed the post, please head over to the site and share or leave a comment! –> Let’s Try Abstracting Data Storage in WordPress

Let’s Try Abstracting Data Storage in WordPress

March 26th, 2014 | Posted at WPShout 

This post a bit of an “advanced WordPress development” exclusive, but I can’t help but nod along with most of Eric Mann’s points in this post proposing a change to the way WordPress stores data. Because it’s so deeply integrated into WordPress, it’s impossible to exaggerate how long it would take — even if aContinue Reading

This is a post from WPShout. If you enjoyed the post, please head over to the site and share or leave a comment! –> Let’s Try Abstracting Data Storage in WordPress

A Simple Introduction to How Password Storage Works

March 26th, 2014 | Posted at Press Up 

One of the most interesting things that I didn’t understand before I really spent much time learning about computers is how passwords work. It seems kind of stupid, but it’s an interesting and important question: how is a site validating that you’re you? The Naivest Possible Password System Well, pretty simply, you can make a [...]

The post A Simple Introduction to How Password Storage Works appeared first on Press Up.

A Simple Introduction to How Password Storage Works

March 26th, 2014 | Posted at Press Up 

One of the most interesting things that I didn’t understand before I really spent much time learning about computers is how passwords work. It seems kind of stupid, but it’s an interesting and important question: how is a site validating that you’re you? The Naivest Possible Password System Well, pretty simply, you can make a [...]

The post A Simple Introduction to How Password Storage Works appeared first on Press Up.

From Link Banana

Graph TV

April 17th, 2014 | Posted at Link Banana 

Graph TV

This is a really fun little web app: check out the way a television show performed over time in the eyes of its audience. It’s pulling data from IMDb and graphing it simply. Some interesting samples, if you’re too lazy to think of them:

  • The Wire, every white intellectual-ish American’s favorite show.
  • Lost, whose final episode was widely panned.
  • Dexter, which seems to have totally lost its audience the whole last season.
  • Two and Half Men, the much-panned sitcom which famously lost Charlie Sheen and replaced him with Ashton Kutcher. Guess when…
  • Breaking Bad, the recently concluded quite popular show about a science-teacher turn meth dealer.
  • Arrested Development, the short-lived much-loved sitcom whose revival on Netflix got mixed reviews.

(via 5 Intriguing Things, which is consistently fanastic. Seriously, you want this in your inbox.)

Mormonism’s Digital Conversion

April 17th, 2014 | Posted at Link Banana 

Mormonism’s Digital Conversion

Really interesting story of how since deciding that technology wasn’t a sinful temptation, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has found it much more effective as a way to use the young people engaging in its famous missionary period:

Even within a church legendary for adding converts with machine-like efficiency, the Internet-only mission has been an outlier. Whereas traditional Mormon missionaries convert, on average, six people during their 18- to 24-month service, the online apostles in Provo have averaged around 30 converts per missionary per year, says Burton. And these people stick around. Ninety-five percent of the Internet converts have kept active, a retention rate more than triple the norm.

(via The Browser)

People Just Want to Date Themselves

April 16th, 2014 | Posted at Link Banana 

People Just Want to Date Themselves

I’ve always found this idea kind of tenuous, but hard to deny:

The data reveals a clear pattern: People are interested in people like themselves. Women on eHarmony favor men who are similar not just in obvious ways — age, attractiveness, education, income — but also in less apparent ones, such as creativity. Even when eHarmony includes a quirky data point — like how many pictures are included in a user’s profile — women are more likely to message men similar to themselves. In fact, of the 102 traits in the data set, there was not one for which women were more likely to contact men with opposite traits.1

Men were a little more open-minded. For 80 percent of traits, they were more willing to message those different from them. They still preferred mates who were similar in terms of height or attractiveness2, but they cared less about these traits — and they didn’t care much at all about other things women cared about, like similarity in education level or number of photos taken.3 They cared less about whether their match shared their ethnicity.4

While the author is kind of careful, she does have a bit of a corrupted data set — using data almost exclusively form a website whose whole business model is matching similar people — she at least acknowledges it. Still would like to see someone find a better way to study the topic, but the basic fact that most couples are more similar than different is hard to deny.

Why Zebras Have Stripes

April 16th, 2014 | Posted at Link Banana 

Why Zebras Have Stripes

I’d heard the answer — in short, flies seem to disliked landing on striped surfaces, and so stripes horses are less likely to be bitten — but it wasn’t ‘til I read this little explanation of the study from Michael Lemonick that I thought it worth a note. The reason? There method was interesting:

So Caro and his colleagues tried a different approach. They took all twenty known species and subspecies of wild equids, including zebras, horses, and wild asses, and looked at how much striping each group has and where on the body it appears. Then they matched the range of the animals to the various factors that have been suggested as evolutionary reasons stripes might have appeared—the presence of large predators, for example, climate, or the kind of vegetation that is prevalent where zebras live.

Almost none of these factors correlated strongly with whether a species or subspecies was boldly striped, subtly striped, or stripeless—except for the prevalence of biting flies.

Trademarks Fallen to Genericide

April 15th, 2014 | Posted at Link Banana 

Trademarks Fallen to Genericide

Jason Kottke calls our attention to a great Wikipedia list, that of brands that died from being overused as the common name for their property.

I’ve not listen to it in a while, but it reminded me of this episode from the old CBC radio show The Age of Persuasion, which covered the topic of genericide.

How Walmart Spread

April 15th, 2014 | Posted at Link Banana 

How Walmart Spread

This isn’t new by a long stretch, but it’s an awesome map: animating the spread of Walmart in its growth out of Arkansas and across the US. It cuts off in 2010, and inspired an animated GIF made with Excel. (!?) The GIF is below:

excelhero_walmart_growth

I looked this up in part because of a recent post from Shane Parrish which quote’s Sam Walton’s explanation of their strategy:

We figured we had to build our stores so that our distribution centers, or warehouses, could take care of them, but also so those stores could be controlled. We wanted them within reach of our district managers, and of ourselves here in Bentonville, so we could get out there and look after them. Each store had to be within a day’s drive of a distribution center.

We saturated northwest Arkansas. We saturated Oklahoma. We saturated Missouri. We went from Neosho to Joplin, to Monett and Aurora, to Nevada and Belton, to Harrisonville, and then on to Fort Scott and Olathe in Kansas —and so on.

Splitting the US by Closest Capital

April 14th, 2014 | Posted at Link Banana 

Splitting the US by Closest Capital

Cool: a map that redivides the United States not by which state capital is closest in any given land area:

map-of-united-states-split-by-closest-capitalRelated: the same technique, but splitting the US among to Major League Baseball teams.

 

Splitting the US by Closest Capital

April 14th, 2014 | Posted at Link Banana 

Splitting the US by Closest Capital

Cool: a map that redivides the United States not by which state capital is closest in any given land area:

map-of-united-states-split-by-closest-capitalRelated: the same technique, but splitting the US among to Major League Baseball teams.

 

How to Become More Disciplined

April 11th, 2014 | Posted at Link Banana 

How to Become More Disciplined

I say it a lot, but I love a good Ask MetaFilter thread. This one is about self-discipline, something I’m pretty passionate about — you should read up on another site I maintain, Frozen Toothpaste, for more from me about it. Perhaps start at its Productivity category.

The whole comment thread as many gems, but the comment from “jdroth” really resonates with my experience:

For me, the key to discipline is intrinsic motivation. That is, pursuing activities that I’m naturally motivated to accomplish without any sort of outside pressure. “But wait!” you might be saying. “Then all I’d ever want to do is screw, play Flappy Bird, and eat ice cream.” Well, those things are nice, but turns out they don’t actually provide any sort of long-term fulfillment. Instead, pursuing intrinsic goals (that term again) that are challenging (but not too challenging) and meaningful make me (and other people) happier than hedonism.